Intersectionality


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  Ideas wall

Language/messaging

  • Terminology GBV vs VAWG - GBV can be more inclusive of different forms and groups
  • Importance of language
  • In countries, many simultaneous campaigns.  Varied messages on VAWG confuses people

Complexity

  • There are some complexities in behaviour.  Attitude and social norms which are context specific and change takes time - understand the process of change
  • Continue to value, recognize and understand the complex nature of intersectionality in addressing VAWG/GBV
  • Need to go beyond the concept of intersectional analysis and really look at the what divisions are important, like age
  • For program planning, we have to remember one size does not fit all.  There is not one, single pathway to change
  • Agree with the messiness of intersectionality
  • There are some complexities in behaviour, attitude and social norms which are context specific and changes take time - understand the pros and cons of change
  • No singular direction-ing of norm change and intersectionality
  • Continue to value, recognize and understand the complex nature of intersectionality in addressing VAWG/GBV
  • Importance of research into causes of violence and intersectional factors
  • interplay between norms specifically about VAWG and broader norms related to gender-equality and non-restrictive roles
  • Linkages with other movements on other identities - need to explore more; sex workers is an example

Power

  • Focus must be on "battle" of power and culture
  • Addressing VAW through the power lens - prevent broader violence
  • Need to work with breaking the silence of women in elite classes or in powerful positions
  • Haven't created spaces for elite women as survivors to engage.  Questions about whether we should, but also big support.
  • Ecological model can be a  bit devoid of power analysis
  • Violence is structured/rooted in institutions
  • Duty bearers and legislation as representations of social norms and reinforce positive or negative social norms

Religion/tradition

  • Impact of challenging behaviours or traditional practices can lead to more severe consequences (because they feel the need to hide from)
  • Societal norms and pressures (women MUST be married) it's so important for girls to marry, they seek out FGM even without parents' consent, so pressure not only family - faith influences attitudes
  • Session on Changing social norms, religious leaders and intersectionality
  • Mixture of culture and religion as a challenge to address attitudes and norms - how do we deal with that?
  • Influence of apostolic churches
  • Women who participate in NGOs and the church: potentially parallel processes of empowerment and disempowerment
  • Invented traditions - so invent new ones
  • Difference between religion and how we interpret it


Interrogations

  • Mixture of culture and religion as a challenge to address attitudes and norms - how do we deal with that?
  • Intersectionality - how Oxfam can work on this?
  • How to address taboos?
  • How can feminist evaluation with an intersectional analysis influence, shape and challenge the dominant scientific model?
  • How to incorporate the linkages of other forms of violence (ethnic) in our response?
  • How do we live with intersectionality?  Dialogues, recruitment, levels of employment and pay equity
  • How do we decide which "norms" to replace so-called "harmful norms" with?
  • How can we make intersectionality a lived experience and practice
  • How to embrace uncomfortable spaces rather than silencing

Resources

OxfamNovib_GBVrapportVicci

Rapport RdeBruyn.InterfaceGBVHIV.Oct.2007

Presenters

Laura Haylocklaura.haylock@oxfam.ca
SVRI.  “Conceptual framework”

Laura Haylock - Oxfam's Conceptual Framework on Changing Social Norms - SVRI and P2P

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